In this lesson, I will look into the matter of which grains you can use for making whiskey in the United States. You would think that this question would be relatively easy to figure out, as SURELY there must be some kind of list of approved grains somewhere on the TTB’s website (they are the authorities) and you would be all set. Right? Wrong. Depending on how you interpret the TTB rules and the mind-numbing Code of Federal Regulations, it is either just “grains” or maybe more specifically “cereal grains” (which would leave out pseudocereals). If you do not know

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In this third lesson, I will tell you about all the different American whiskey types, other than Bourbon. In the United States, there are a mind-boggling 35 different types of whiskey, approved by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). A post covering all 35 types would be too long and boring – so I decided to cover a handful of the most important ones and simply just list the rest. So … here goes: Bourbon – already covered in Lesson 01. Rye whiskey A close cousin to Bourbon, as most of the rules are the same, but

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In this second lesson, I will be looking into another classic question: Do you want the good news or the bad news first? Let us take the god news first: We know exactly where the name Bourbon comes from. And the bad news: We are not sure how the name Bourbon got attached to our beloved whiskey. Confused? Read on – and all will be (sort of) clear. The name Bourbon comes from the “House of Bourbon”, which is the name of a part of the French royal dynasty – and to some extend the Spanish royal dynasty as well.

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This is the first of (hopefully) many “Bourbon 101” posts, where I will try to answer different questions, under the “American Whiskey” umbrella. And why not kick if off with one of the most fundamental questions: Bourbon is one of approximately 35 different types of American whiskeys that are officially recognized by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). It is also – by miles – the type of whiskey that is most popular and thus produced in the largest quantities. To be able to call your product Bourbon, you must adhere to a number of very strict

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